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How to Remove SuperGlue from your Fingers and Skin

August 20th, 2011

Hope he reads this post!

Everybody loves superglue. It bonds darn near anything to darn near anything else, darn near instantly.

There’s only one problem: it also bonds skin.

Another problem: it’s hard to remove from skin once it dries – or even before it dries.

Most people will tell you to use nail polish remover. Others will spend way too much money on official “Superglue Remover” products.

But there’s a very simple way to remove superglue that works in seconds…

That very simple way to remove superglue is acetone.

You see, it used to be that acetone was one of the key ingredients in nail polish remover. In recent years, however, the amount of acetone in many nail polish removers has been decreased or even eliminated as it tends to loosen false nails.

If you have superglued two fingers together, apply a few drops of acetone to the glued area, and pull gently. Reapply more acetone, and repeat.

Once your fingers are unstuck, or if you just have some dried superglue on you hands, get a rag. Apply some acetone to the rag. Rub the dried superglue on your fingers for a bit, and the superglue will magically dissolve. Put some more acetone on the rag and repeat the process until all traces of the glue are removed.

Acetone tends to strip fats from the skin, so it will leave your hands very, very dry.

Once you’re done cleaning up all the superglue from your hands, wash them thoroughly in soap and water and use a moisturizer to rehydrate your skin.

The best skin moisturizer in the entire universe is Argan Oil, which comes from a tree. It’s natural, it works, and it’s even safe for those of you with crazy allergies. It also has some rather peculiar healing properties in my experience!

So, there you have it. As with expandy foam, your best friend when working with superglue is acetone.

You can also use acetone to remove superglue from various surfaces, but test a small spot first. Acetone is not very friendly to certain finishes and materials!

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  1. He-who-must-not-be-named
    May 12th, 2012 at 14:41 | #1

    A very cheap and simplest way is to use cooking oil! Rub it and viola! It’s as if it wasn’t been there

    • May 14th, 2012 at 13:56 | #2

      It works if the glue is still wet, but if it’s started to dry, you’re in trouble. It’s a good trick if you’re quick and you don’t have any acetone, though!

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